Our Leopard

I can’t remember how many game reserves we have been to and how hard the rangers have tried to find me a Leopard, but it finally happened. Over the weekend at Kapama Private Game Reserve, we finally saw my favourite big cat and the only one I have not photographed.

Kapama Leopard

He was a huge male and had no problem posing for us.

The picture was taken by my daughter. I am so proud of how she took these shots. (There are many more but I wanted to post this one for now)

Our Leopard was originally published on TechRoss’ Blog

3D Printed Dossing Housing

I have been offered the use of a 3D printer so the first thing I thought off was parts for my AController.

My biggest problem at the moment is a plug box but this is not really going to offer a solution.

The next thing that was on my mind was the dossing system and how to house it.  Here is the opportunity so over the last week I have been learning some Blender 3D and put together a model that I will get printed.

Here are a few shots…

Syringe Tray

The syringe and servo tray

2014-10-02 12_39_28-Blender_ [C__Users_Ross_Dropbox_Blender_DossingHolder003.blend]

The tray holder / housing

2014-10-02 12_39_49-Blender_ [C__Users_Ross_Dropbox_Blender_DossingHolder003.blend]

The completed unit (it has changed a lot since this)

3D Printed Dossing Housing was originally published on TechRoss’ Blog

Intel Galileo Gen 2

This is a nice bit of kit that I think I would like to play with… galileo2_002

The Galileo SBCs are supported with an open source Linux OS that includes the Arduino software libraries, “enabling scalability and re-use of existing software, called ‘sketches’,” says Intel. Currently, Intel has created two versions of Linux for the board: “the default is a small Linux. If you add an SD card to your kit, you can add a more fully-featured Linux,” says Intel. The boards can be programmed from Windows, Mac OS, and Linux host computers. The boards are currently supported with a Yocto 1.4 “Poky” Linux release, according to Intel.

Processor, Memory & Storage

  • Processor — Intel Quark X1000 SoC @ 400MHz:
  • 32-bit Intel Pentium-compatible ISA
  • 512KB embedded SRAM (in Quark SoC)
  • 256MB DDR3 DRAM
  • 8MB legacy SPI NOR flash (for firmware/bootloader)
  • 8KB EEPROM (programmable via utilities)
  • Micro SD slot — supports up to 32GB
  • Supports USB 2.0 storage devices

Arduino-compatible expansion headers, containing

  • Support both 3.3V or 5V shields, as selected by an onboard jumper.
  • 20x GPIOs (12 fully native speed)
  • 6x analog inputs
  • 6x PWMs with 12-bit resolution
  • 1x SPI master
  • 2x UARTs (one shared with console UART)
  • 1x I2C master
  • RTC — onboard battery option
  • Reset button for resetting sketch and attached shields (resets Ethernet)
  • Reboot button for processor restart

Connectivity

  • 10/100 Ethernet (RJ45; supports Power-over-Ethernet)
  • USB 2.0 Host port (Type A)
  • USB 2.0 Client port (micro-USB, Type B)

Power

  • 7-15VDC input jack (consumption not currently specified)
  • Supports Power-over-Ethernet (requires PoE module)
  • Optional 3V coin cell battery for standby power

Dimensions

  • 123.8 x 72.0mm

Intel Galileo Gen 2

This is a nice bit of kit that I think I would like to play with…

galileo2_002

The Galileo SBCs are supported with an open source Linux OS that includes the Arduino software libraries, “enabling scalability and re-use of existing software, called ‘sketches’,” says Intel. Currently, Intel has created two versions of Linux for the board: “the default is a small Linux. If you add an SD card to your kit, you can add a more fully-featured Linux,” says Intel. The boards can be programmed from Windows, Mac OS, and Linux host computers. The boards are currently supported with a Yocto 1.4 “Poky” Linux release, according to Intel.

Processor, Memory & Storage

  • Processor — Intel Quark X1000 SoC @ 400MHz:
  • 32-bit Intel Pentium-compatible ISA
  • 512KB embedded SRAM (in Quark SoC)
  • 256MB DDR3 DRAM
  • 8MB legacy SPI NOR flash (for firmware/bootloader)
  • 8KB EEPROM (programmable via utilities)
  • Micro SD slot — supports up to 32GB
  • Supports USB 2.0 storage devices

Arduino-compatible expansion headers, containing

  • Support both 3.3V or 5V shields, as selected by an onboard jumper.
  • 20x GPIOs (12 fully native speed)
  • 6x analog inputs
  • 6x PWMs with 12-bit resolution
  • 1x SPI master
  • 2x UARTs (one shared with console UART)
  • 1x I2C master
  • RTC — onboard battery option
  • Reset button for resetting sketch and attached shields (resets Ethernet)
  • Reboot button for processor restart

Connectivity

  • 10/100 Ethernet (RJ45; supports Power-over-Ethernet)
  • USB 2.0 Host port (Type A)
  • USB 2.0 Client port (micro-USB, Type B)

Power

  • 7-15VDC input jack (consumption not currently specified)
  • Supports Power-over-Ethernet (requires PoE module)
  • Optional 3V coin cell battery for standby power

Dimensions

  • 123.8 x 72.0mm

Intel Galileo Gen 2 was originally published on TechRoss’ Blog